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20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
in there. he found out firsthand by traveling to the mississippi delta that something as simple challenge. ♪ ♪ keep your boom boom boom like nobody do ♪ ♪ keep your boom boom boom like nobody do ♪ >> it is often called the birthplace of the blues. these swing sounds are a welcome distraction from the region's joblessness and sparse access to health care. >> a lot of people who need insurance don't have it. i had to be one of them. >> with the fewest working family doctors per capita in the nation, many of these areas have trouble seeing a physician. they average one primary care physician forever 1700 people, worse. >> it's a hard place to live. >> in 2011, just one primary care doctor was registered in sharky county. in humphry's county where more than 9,000 people live, there were two doctors. >> there is not public transportation so people have trouble getting to providers, and you don't have a large number of providers, in particular specialists. >> so we're driving through the mississippi delta right now, and if you look around you can get a sense of how rural this place is
's in here. he fund out firsthand by traveling to the mississippi delta that something as simple as seeing a doctor is a major challenge. ♪ ♪ >> it is often called the birthplace of the blues in the poverty stricken delta this is a welcome distraction from the region's joblessness and spark access to healthcare. ♪ ♪ >> a lot of people that need insurance don't have it. i actually happen to be one of them. >> with the few west working family doctors per capita in the nation many in mississippi's poor and rural areas have trouble seeing a physician. the magnolia state averages 1 physician for every 1700 people. in the delta it is much worse. >> it is a hard place to live. >> in 2011 just one primary care doctor was registered in this county, home to 5,000 people. here, where hou where more than0 live, there is two. >> in delta we have areas with a lot of transportation, there is not public transportation so people have trouble getting to providers and you don't have a large number of provide res, in particularly, specialists. >> so, we're driving through the mississippi delta. if y
of us were arrested and jailed in mississippi during the freedom ride. a bus was set on fire in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed, but we helped bring them in to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 196 1963 as the new chairmanf the student non-violent committee. we met with president kennedy, who said the frustration throughout america. in 1963 we cannot because of the color of our skin. we had t to pay a tax, pass a tt because of the color of our skin and pass a vote in jelly beans in a jar. thousand of people were arrested trying to participate in the integration process. many innocent were killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28, 1963, the nation's capitol was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surroundedded this city, little stores were closed, but the march was so orderly, so peaceful it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believe in a way of peace, the way of l
as the negro in mississippi cannot vote and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. >> there was no way to know then that it would have the impact that it has had. it's just fantastic. >> there's no way in the world we ever believed we'd live long enough to see a black president. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> i cried, because it never occurred to me that i would live long enough to see a black man become president of the united states. >> for a black man in this societies, there's always been this need to be cautious about the way you presented yourself in public, because you could end up like trayvon. i think dr. king let us understand that you still had to take the risk. i love bang black man in america, because it means that there's still hope that things can be changed without mowing down thousands of citizens the way that's happening in other parts of the world. >> it still hurts when other people don't think of you as an american, you're a black american, but you really aren't an american. if the rest of the country never sees us as americans, we'll be
she wore for the 1963 march. she remembered the opposite progression in her native mississippi. >> coming no north for the marc, and the federal government on the conditions down south did, in fact, give us th the bear brd base of support. >> crediting the civil rights movement for gay lesbian rights, yet there was the recognition of unmet goals of 19th 63. >> reporter: 50 years later these marchs are repeating the same demands economic and political. jobs and justice. president obama acknowledg acknd progress had stalled. those inequities would have to be tackled in every level of society. >> the successful man who doesn't have to but pays his workers a fair wage and then offers a shot to a man, an ex-con, who may be down on his luck. he's marching. >> reporter: he talked about the politics of division that polarize the government. >> gay rights have been critical of coca-cola sponsorship of the olympics in russia. it accuses coca-cola of supporting hate because of its support of olympics. >> we go to the world's oldest film festival. >> reporter: the high octane glamour of th
george. >>, in mississippi, in alabama, people were struggling to have the right to citizenship, the right to vote, the right to public accommodations. people were being jailed and this was a culmination of those efforts to come to washington and petition the federal government to intervene and insure that in fact all citizens have equal treatment. >> annie, you were there, too, 50 years ago. again, you were there today for the march today. how did being there in 1963 impact who you became no. life. i was 17, and i had a summer job. i was on my way to college and i realized that there were people all over the country who i was aworking class examined kid of immigrant parents but still had this genetic advantage and needed to go down and say i'm standing with everyone else, because it was so important. i went into college thinking i would be a high school english teacher and i said no, i needed to go into journalism to stand up, bear witness and maybe make a difference. >> martha, you've written about the ways in which the women were at times overlooked. there was only one woman
, mississippi, alabama, or in iowa along the river or other places in the midwest, we don't ask, you know, why would you want to rebuild that? we stand up for other americans. and new jersey is a donor state. we get 62 cents back for every dollar we send to the federal government. >> that was "america tonight's" adam may with new jersey's most famous resident, almost a year after hurricane sandy, governor chris christie says they must rebuild but at what cost? we will have that story next week. >>> and still to come, a real life ironman suit that's changing lives one step at a time. >>> finally tonight, technology. for most of us, that means the latest app on a smartphone, but sometimes a piece of hardware can profoundly change lives. >> it's a bionic robot called xcel, a battery powered external skeleton that give her legs the power to do this. >> are you ready? >> three, two, one... >> blastoff! >> and this. >> i'm walking, you guys! >> and even this. >> thank you. >> the technology is so cutting edge, that amanda is the first person in the united states to own one. >> the moment she stood u
rights movement. on june 12th mississippi's naacp field secretary medgar evers was murdered outside his home. dr. king delivered his famous i have a dream speech and on july 2nd, 1964, about the johnson signed the civil rights act of 1964, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since reconstruction. both dr. king and his father led the congregation at ebeneezer baptist church. the current pastor of that church reverend dr. rafael joins me. >> good to be with you tony. thanks so much. >> give us your reflections of this day and move on from there. >> it's been an exciting day and a thrilling week, as we gathered on the mall remembering that great day 50 years ago, i'm a part of the post-civil rights generation, born a decade after dr. king's death. but for americans across the nation dr. king's words that day with his soaring oratory, our right to remember it but our challenge today is to make sure that while we engage in commemoration we move from commemoration to recommitment that we ensure that we do not cash in the dream for sentimental memories, dr. king came to the capital with
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)